Today’s society has coddled a new kind of way of thinking.

Here’s an interesting story of that:

It was a lovely day. The gentleman had just gotten off his flight, had his shiny new rental car in his possession and was on his way back to the hotel to get some well-needed sleep. He sat at a red light and happened to glance at the rearview mirror and was struck with the realization that his great day was about the get much worse. An object grew larger in the center of the mirror rapidly as it flew towards him.

Just then, SMACK! The approaching truck collides with the back of his car. Expecting to see the driver stop so they can exchange insurance information, the man is alarmed when he sees the truck backing up, giving himself the space to drive around the car he has just given a botched rear facelift.

The man’s adrenalin raced. Without thinking, he began to chase him down. While in pursuit, he dialed 911. The dispatcher asked the man “Can you stay with him?”. And in his mind, the only thing that he was thinking was, “Challenge accepted”.

He’s hot on his tail for several minutes until finally in a parking lot the speed racer is cornered between the unlikely hero and an officer. He hops out of his car to see what this heinous person could possibly look like, what kind of fiend could do this? When he saw the person step out from the car, all his anger slipped away and turned to sadness.

It was a kid, no older than 12. He had been drinking, stole his grandparent’s truck, and went on a joyride. But more than that, what the man saw in this child was someone who desperately wanted to grow up,  and simultaneously wanted to be treated as an adolescent.

He wanted to do everything an adult is able to do but didn’t want to take responsibility for it.

True story.

Modern technology has played a negative role in the development of children in this way and was more than likely a contributor to this child’s actions. Children nowadays are exposed to such a strenuous amount of information in a way that no generation before them has experienced. On average, a child spends 7.5 hours a day on entertainment technology. As a result, they can often experience premature adulthood.

So where’s the connection between this child’s actions and his tech exposure? It’s in what they are exposed to and the amount of it. Parents will often regulate what a child watches on television but will not do the same on a tablet.

Road trip? Hand the kid an iPad. Baby is fussy? Let them play with your phone. It has become more about what will keep my child quiet instead of what’s the best way that I can help my child learn.